TWO OF EINHORN HARRIS’ FAMILY LAW ATTORNEYS TO RECEIVE AWARDS FROM THE NEW JERSEY STATE BAR ASSOCIATION

The following post was written over one year ago. Laws often change and recent case decisions may impact how the law is applied. As such, the information in this article may not be current. We encourage you to contact our firm for information on this particular article and to make sure the analysis is still up-to-date.

Denville, NJ –Two of Einhorn Harris’ Family Law attorneys will be receiving awards from the Board of Trustees of the New Jersey State Bar Association on December 14, 2012.  Bonnie C. Frost, Esq. and Thomas J. Snyder, Esq., both partners in the Matrimonial Law Department of Einhorn Harris Ascher Barbarito & Frost, PC will be presented with an Award of Achievement in recognition of their work on two different Amicus Curiae cases.

Amicus Curiae literally translated means “friend of the court” in Latin.  The situation most arises when there is a case in which there are broader issues than those that were raised in the trial court.  When the case comes before the Supreme Court on appeal the amicus curiae, often in the form of a written brief or testimony will address these issues.  These briefs or oral arguments are provided by someone, not a party to a case, who volunteers to offer information to assist a court in deciding a matter before it.

Bonnie C. Frost, Esq. participated as amicus curiae in Segal v. Lynch where she provided written and oral argument in front of the New Jersey Supreme Court on a case which addressed whether a parenting coordinator, who is also an attorney, may be awarded fees for the time spent responding to the plaintiff’s motions and subpoenas, and to his grievances against her, under the guidelines of the Parenting Coordinator Pilot Program in New Jersey.   Ms. Frost participated as a representative of the New Jersey State Bar Association (NJSBA), along with two other attorneys, suggesting that that judges should be given the discretion as to whether these fees and expenses are appropriate.  In addition to the brief she participated in above, Ms. Frost has been instrumental in writing six amicus curiae briefs on behalf of the State Bar and has argued more than 200 cases at the appellate level, of which 17 are published.

Thomas J. Snyder, Esq. participated, as a representative of the New Jersey State Bar Association, as amicus curiae in Tannen v. Tannen.  The case asked whether it is proper to impute income to the defendant based on her beneficial interest in a discretionary trust for purposes of determining the plaintiff’s alimony and child support obligations. The NJSBA brief was drafted by Mr. Snyder along with eight (8) of his colleagues from the New Jersey State Bar Association in which the NJSBA urged that existing trust law be followed, as opposed to adopting new trust principles. The NJSBA further argued that, under existing law, third-party trusts cannot be compelled to make distributions, but imputation of income on assets can be considered by courts in making support determinations.  Mr. Snyder has previously been recognized by the New Jersey State Bar Association for his contributions to the Bar’s amicus brief in the matter of Lewis v. Harris, a case of first impression in New Jersey which addresses same sex couples’ right to marriage equality.  Mr. Snyder is also a recipient of the New Jersey State Bar Association’s distinguished legislative service award in connection with amending New Jersey law to permit irreconcilable differences as a basis for divorce.

For more than half a century, Einhorn Harris Ascher Barbarito and Frost, PC has been providing legal services for businesses, families and individuals.   The firm takes pride in providing individualized attention to meet our clients’ every legal need for every aspect of their lives.  Every Step of the way.  www.einhornharris.com